Ben has worked on climate adaptation for 10 years, with a focus on developing systems to manage climate risks, and a particular interest in the water sector. He leads GCAP's climate screening work. Follow him @bdp_smith on twitter.

General Election 2017: a climate perspective

The UK goes back to the polls again in June for another election (we just can’t enough of democracy!) so its worth considering what this means for climate adaptation and mitigation in the UK. Clearly at this point a huge amount is uncertain, but I think there are several implications:

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A little climate optimism

A little climate optimism
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The UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017

The UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017

You might have missed it under the deluge of Trump and Brexit news, but the UK Climate Risk Assessment 2017 was published last month. A five-yearly requirement under the 2008 Climate Change Act, the results will be used to inform the development of the next instalment of the UK National Adaptation Programme, due in 2018.

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Growth in the wrong place: water and jobs in the U.S

Growth in the wrong place: water and jobs in the U.S
US Precipitation

The U.S has a problem. No, not that one, but a very particular problem related to the geography of growth and water availability. Put simply, both population growth and job growth in the U.S appears to increasingly concentrated in a handful of states, while a significant number, in particular in the Midwest, are experiencing decreases in population, with internal migration playing an big role. Adam Carstens has a neat summary at Medium highlighting these trends, and Forbes notes that 7 of the 10 of their ‘best for jobs’ cities in 2017 are concentrated in water-stressed western states (Utah, Arizona, Texas and California). Importantly, these are not just short-term blips, but reflect longer-term changes as well – 7 of the 10 fastest growing states from 1990-2000 were also western states.

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Recognising climate risks

Recognising climate risks
WEF Likelihood

The WEF Global Risks Report was published last week, and as ever contains plenty of things to keep you up worrying about at 3am. The report notes the increasing interconnectedness of risks, and the potential for societal polarization and inequality to produce political outcomes which reduce our ability to deal with global risks. Strikingly though, climate-related risks account for 4/5 of the highest impact risks, and 2/3 (arguably 3/3 if we include a climate-migration link) of the most likely risks.

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